Recent Fire Damage Posts

Only ONE Fire Matters to You

5/5/2021 (Permalink)

Roof of a house is burned and only the beams remain. House suffered severe fire damage in Chappaqua, New York.

Did you know?

National fire statistics indicate that a residential fire occurs approximately every 90 seconds somewhere in the United States (U.S. Fire Administration). However, when you suffer a fire, only one fire matters to you.

Personal belongings are a treasure of life, and a reflection of hard work and achievements. Photographs, books, and other personal items have a value that cannot be put into words nor numbers. SERVPRO  of Tarrytown/Elmsford Professionals have the ability to help restore your belongings. 

Why do we try to restore versus replace?

  • Restoration reduces claims payout and saves you money.
  • In most cases, we are able to return belongings to pre loss condition.
  • Many treasured belongings and keepsakes can be saved!

If your home or business suffers fire damage, don't hesitate to call SERVPRO of Tarrytown/Elmsford at (914) 358-9000 immediately. 

We are working to make fire damage "Like it never even happened." 

What are grease Fires?

3/23/2021 (Permalink)

stove top stove top

A grease fire happens when your cooking oil becomes too hot. When heating, oils first start to boil, then they'll start smoking, and then they'll catch on fire. Most vegetable oils have a smoking point around 450°F, while animal fats like lard or goose fat will start smoking around 375°F.  

In an Event Where a Grease fire occurs, here are some steps to put it out: 

Turn the Heat Off - Don't try to move the pot. You might accidentally splash yourself or your kitchen with burning oil. And that would be bad.

Cover the Pot with a Metal Lid - Fire cannot exist in the absence of oxygen. With the lid on (and the heat off), the fire should quickly consume all the oxygen and put itself out. Use a metal lid since glass will shatter.

Pour on Baking Soda - Baking soda will extinguish grease fires, but only if they're small. It takes a lot of baking soda to do the job.

Spray the Pot with a Class B Dry Chemical Fire Extinguisher - This is your last resort, as fire extinguishers will contaminate your kitchen. Still, it's better than the alternative if the fire is getting out of control.

Get Out and Call 911 - If the fire does break out of control, don't try to be a hero. Get out and find a phone to call 911.

Fire Dangers and Safety Tips

3/9/2021 (Permalink)

Firefighter pointing with fire behind him Firefighter pointing with fire behind him

Fire Dangers and Safety Tips

Want some great advice on how to keep your home safe from fire? Just follow these tips and suggestions from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control's Division of Unintentional Injury Prevention:

  • The most common causes of residential fires are cooking and heating equipment. When cooking, never leave food on a stove or in an oven unattended, and avoid wearing clothes with long, loose-fitting sleeves.
  • Smoking is the leading cause of fire deaths and the second most common cause of residential fires. If you are a smoker, do not smoke in bed, never leave burning cigarettes unattended, do not empty smoldering ashes in a trash can, and keep ashtrays away from upholstered furniture and curtains.
  • Keep matches and lighters away from children's reach. Safely store flammable substances used around the home, and never leave burning candles unattended.
  • Install smoke alarms outside each separate sleeping area and on every floor of your home, including the basement.Working smoke alarms can reduce the risk of death in a residential fire by 40 to 50 percent. The CDC suggests smoke alarms with lithium-powered batteries and hush buttons. A lithium-powered battery can last up to 10 years, and a hush button allows you to quickly stop nuisance alarms that are caused by steam, oven smoke, etc.
  • If 10-year, long-life smoke alarms are not available, install smoke alarms that use regular batteries and replace the batteries every year. (A useful tip to help you remember: In the fall, when you change your clocks to standard time, change your batteries!)
  • Test smoke alarms every month to make sure they work properly.
  • Make a family fire escape plan and practice it every six months. In the plan, discuss at least two different ways to get out of every room and designate a safe place in front of the house or apartment building for family members to meet after escaping a fire.

Who Will Put the Pieces Back?

2/1/2021 (Permalink)

Entry way and stairs affected by fire damage Entry way of the building destroyed by fire damage

SERVPRO of Tarrytown/Elmsford understand the feelings of frustration and overwhelming concern for how to properly handle a fire damage. Their priority is helping you and your customers regain control. SERVPRO Franchise Professionals also understand business closures due to fire damage don't just affect the business owner; they affect the employees, their families and the community. 

Preventative Tips: 

  • Install smoke alarms outside each sleeping area on every level of a home
  • Check Smoke alarms once per month and change the batteries at least once per year
  • Plan an escape route and practice it at least twice a year

Pre Testing 

When a SERVPRO Franchise Professional arrives on the scene following a fire, their first step is to calm the customer's fears. The second step is to pre-test the smoke to determine what type of fire has taken place. Knowing the types of smoke and their behavior patterns is crucial 

  • Wet smoke - Plastics and rubber.
  • Dry Smoke - Paper and Wood. 
  • Protein smoke- Produced by evaporation of material rather than from a fire
  • Fuel Oil Soot- Furnace Puff Backs. 
  • Other- Tear gas, Fingerprint powder, and fire extinguisher residue. 

Smoke and soot residue can damage carpet, upholstery and contents if not removed quickly and efficiently. In a fire-damage structure with soot on the walls and other surfaces, cleaning and restoration is less disruptive and more cost-efficient than replacement. 

Fire Damage Repair and Restoration

1/25/2021 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Repair and Restoration Fire Damage Repair and Restoration

Fire Damage Repair and Restoration

There is nothing worse than a house fire. Not only are your house and belongings damaged but also there is often a risk to you and your family. Even after the fire has been dealt with, there is the aftermath of the fire to deal with. Fires can be especially devastating to your home or business. After the fire trucks leave, your property will likely suffer from not only fire and smoke damage, but also widespread water damage and flooding from firefighting efforts. SERVPRO Franchise Professionals have specialized fire and water damage restoration training and experience to quickly clean up and restore your home to pre-fire condition. They also can remove the pervasive smoke odor and deep-clean soot from upholstery and carpet. 

Please refer to our Fire Damage Tips - Until Help Arrives Guide and follow these tips to protect yourself and your property.

Do you know what to do after a fire has been put out?

12/10/2020 (Permalink)

House after fire, kitchen covered in soot House after fire, kitchen covered in soot

Do you know what to do after a fire has been put out?

Follow the DO's below to avoid any further damage:

  • Limit movement in the home to prevent soot particles from being embedded into upholstery and carpet. 
  • Keep hands clean. Soot on hands can further soil upholstery, walls and woodwork.
  • Place dry, colorfast towels or old linens on rugs, upholstery and carpet traffic areas.
  • If electricity is off, empty freezer and refrigerator completely and prop doors open to help prevent odor.  
  • Wipe soot from chrome on kitchen and bathroom faucets, trim and appliances, then protect these surfaces with a light coating of lubricant.
  • If heat is off during winter, pour RV antifreeze in sinks, toilet bowls, holding tanks and tubs to avoid freezing pipes and fixtures.
  • Wash both sides of leaves on houseplants.
  • Change HVAC filter, but leave system off until a trained professional can check the system.
  • Tape double layers of cheesecloth over air registers to stop particles of soot from getting in or out of the HVAC system.

Contact SERVPRO of Tarrytown/Elmsford for a quick emergency response. 

Thanksgiving Safety

11/19/2020 (Permalink)

Pie split into percentage of home fires Pie split into percentage of home fires

We know that the kitchen is usually the heart of the home, and on Thanksgiving that is specially true. On a holiday that really brings families together in the kitchen, we want to remind you of some tips to keep in mind while you and your loved ones are busy prepping the big Thanksgiving dinner. 

10 Thanksgiving Safety Tips:

  • Stay in the kitchen when you are cooking on the stove top so you can keep an eye on the food.
  • Stay in the home when cooking your turkey, and check on it frequently.
  • Keep children away from the stove. The stove will be hot and kids should stay three feet away.
  • Make sure kids stay away from hot food and liquids. The steam or splash from vegetables, gravy or coffee could cause serious burns.
  • Keep knives out of the reach of children.
  • Be sure electric cords from an electric knife, coffee maker, plate warmer or mixer are not dangling off the counter within easy reach of a child.
  • Keep matches and utility lighters out of the reach of children — up high in a locked cabinet.
  • Never leave children alone in room with a lit candle.
  • Keep the floor clear so you don’t trip over kids, toys, pocketbooks or bags.
  • Make sure your smoke alarms are working. Test them by pushing the test button.

Every year, fire departments respond to hundreds of home cooking fires on Thanksgiving Day and unattended cooking is the leading source of those fires. Click here to learn more about fire safety in the kitchen. Keeping these tips in mind on this joyous holiday will help you make sure you can enjoy the day with your loved ones and keep everyone in the home safe. 

We hope that everyone stays safe this Thanksgiving Day. However, if a fire does occur and your home suffers fire damage, it can be especially devastating. In addition to the fire and smoke damage, your property may have substantial water damage from firefighting efforts. SERVPRO of Tarrytown/Elmsford has the specialized fire and water damage equipment and expertise to help you through the tough times. 

Fire Safety during the Holiday Season

11/18/2020 (Permalink)

Mother and children sitting on rug holding candle and Christmas Tree behind them A dry Christmas Tree can erupt and consume all the oxygen in the room within 40 seconds.

With the onset of the holiday season, homeowners and business owners across the country will begin decorating their properties with festive lights, trees, candles and more. While these items can add plenty of charm and cheer, there are a few potential dangers your customers and loved ones should be aware of during the winter months. 

Candles alone cause an estimated 15,600 fires each year, causing 1,270 injuries and more than $539 million in property damage. December is the peak month for candle fires, and Christmas day is the peak day. More than half of all candle fires start because the candle is set too close to a combustible material. 

According to the U.S. Fire administration, Christmas trees account for an estimated 200 fires annually and cause more than $6 million in property damage. These fires can be easily prevented simply by keeping your live tree watered. 

Tips and statistics reproduced from NFPA's Web site. (2009)

Prevent Your Home From Fires This Halloween

10/27/2020 (Permalink)

Carved pumpkin and candles Carved pumpkin and candles

Halloween is a time for tricks and treats, but it's also a time to be cautious about fires. According to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), decorations are the first thing to ignite in more than 1,000 reported home fires each year. Here are a few things you can do this Halloween to prevent fires in your home from NFPA and the American Red Cross.

  • Dried flowers, cornstalks, and crepe paper are highly flammable. Keep these and other decorations well away from all open flames and heat sources, including light bulbs and heaters. 
  • It is safest to use a flashlight or battery-operated candle in a jack-o-lantern, use long, fireplace-style matches or a utility lighter. Be sure to place lit pumpkins well away from anything that can burn and far enough out of the way of trick-or-treaters, doorsteps, walkways, and yards. 
  • Remember to keep exits clear of decorations so nothing blocks escape routes.
  • Use flashlights as alternatives to candles or torch lights when decorating walkways and yards. They are much safer for trick-or-treaters, whose costumes may brush against the lighting.
  • When using a real candle to light your jack-o-lantern, make sure the candle gets blown out when you can't monitor it, especially when you leave your home.
  • Always remember to turn off any running electric appliances before you leave home, blow out candles, and unplug fire hazards, such as lights, that might get too hot.

Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen

10/6/2020 (Permalink)

Fire Prevention Week 2020 Fire Prevention Week 2020

Did you know that cooking is the #1 cause of home fires and fire injuries? 

Fire Prevention week is October 4-10. This year's campaign is "Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen". The purpose of the campaign is to educate people about simple steps they can take to keep everyone in the home safe. 

Below is a cooking safety checklist you can use to make sure you and your loved ones are taking as many precautions as possible to prevent accidents:

  • Does a grown-up always pay attention to things that are cooking?
  • Does a grown-up watch the stovetop when he or she is frying, boiling, grilling, or broiling food?
  • If a grown-up must leave the kitchen for even a short period of time, does he or she turns off the burner?
  • Are things that can burn, such as dish towels, curtains, or paper, away from the stovetop?
  • Are the stovetop, burners, and oven clean — no spilled food, grease, paper or bags?
  • Are pot handles turned toward the back of the stove when a grown-up is cooking?
  • Do children and pets stay out of the kid-free zone (3 feet or 1 meter from the stove) when a grown-up is cooking?
  • Are containers opened slowly when removing from the microwave? Hot steam can escape from containers and cause burns.
  • Does your family have working smoke alarms on every level of the home, outside all sleeping areas, and in each bedroom?
  • Does your family have a home fire escape plan?
  • Do you practice the plan?

To learn more about what you can do to prevent home fires and fire injuries visit firepreventionweek.org.

Fire Damage DO'S and DON'TS

9/22/2020 (Permalink)

Side of the house completely burned Residential house in Croton-on-Hudson suffered fire damage

SERVPRO is a Franchise company with over 38 years of leadership. Our track record of results has earned us trust of the insurance industry, countless homeowners, and in one unforgettable instance, even the Pentagon. 

SERVPRO of Tarrytown/Elmsford technicians are a team of specialists, trained to professionally clean your home and personal Belongings. 

What can you do before there is any professionals around to help? SERVPRO has some tips for you. 

Fire damage & Smoke DO'S

  • Limit movement in the home to prevent soot particles from being embedded into upholstery and carpet.
  • Keep your hands clean. Soot on hands can further soil upholstery, walls, and woodwork.
  • Place dry, colorfast towels or old linens on rugs, upholstery and carpet traffic areas. 
  • If electricity is off, empty freezer and refrigerator completely and prop doors open to help prevent odor. 
  • Wipe soot from chrome on kitchen and bathroom faucets, trim and appliances, then protect these surfaces with a light coating of lubricant.
  • If heat is off during winter, pour RV antifreeze in sinks, toilet bowls, holding tanks and tubs to avoid freezing pipes and fixtures. 
  • Wash both sides of leaves on house plants. 
  • Change HVAC filter, but leave system off until a trained professional can check the system.
  • Tape Double layers of cheesecloth over air registers to stop particles of soot from getting in or out of the HVAC system.

 Fire damage & Smoke DON'TS

  • Attempt to wash any walls or painted surfaces without first contacting your SERVPRO Franchise Professional
  • Attempt to shampoo carpet or upholstered furniture without first consulting your SERVPRO Franchise Professional.
  • Attempt to clean any electrical appliances (TV sets, radios, etc.) that may have been close to fire, heat or water without first consulting an authorized repair service. 
  • Consume any food or beverages that may have been stored close to fire, heat or water. (They may be contaminated) 
  • Turn on ceiling fixtures if ceiling is wet. Wiring may be wet or damaged and cause electrical shock, and air movement may create secondary damage. 
  • Send garments to the dry Cleaner. Improper cleaning may set smoke odor. 

These Emergency Tips will assist you in taking the proper action until your SERVPRO of Tarrytown/Elmsford arrives. 

Follow the DO's and DON'TS to reduce damage and increase the chances of a successful restoration. Call SERVPRO of Tarrytown/Elmsford for any remediation help at (914)358-9000.

Structural Cleaning after a Fire

9/17/2020 (Permalink)

Two SERVPRO Technicians cleaning ceiling from soot SERVPRO of Tarrytown/Elmsford technicians are highly experienced in cleaning your structure after a fire.

Did you know?

National fire statistics indicate that a residential fire occurs approximately every 90 seconds somewhere in the United States.

A back drift of emotions often sweeps over the owners after a fire ravages a home. Fear, uncertainty, stress and doubt about the future of property can overwhelm the owner long after the flames have been extinguished and the smoke has cleared.

After a smoke or fire damage, ceilings, walls, woodwork, carpeting and floors will often need a thorough cleaning. Our experienced SERVPRO of Tarrytown/Elmsford will pretest to determine the extent of damage, and then use the specific equipment and cleaning products required to clean and protect the different types of surfaces found in your structure. 

If you experience fire damage, call SERVPRO of Tarrytown/Elmsford at (914) 358-9000 anytime day or night! 

Also, make sure to check out our other blogs on how to prevent fire damage. 

Fireplace Safety

8/5/2020 (Permalink)

indoor fireplace with brick wall indoor fireplace with brick wall

There’s no arguing that a fireplace is the perfect romantic compliment to any Valentine’s Day evening. There’s something magical about the crackling sounds and dancing, soft light of a fire on a chilly February evening. A poorly maintained fireplace can turn that sense of romance into one of terror if it causes the fire to spread. So this Valentine’s day, before you start that fire and sit by the hearth with someone special, take a moment to go over these tips to make sure your home is safe.

  1. Have your fireplace cleaned and inspected regularly

According to the National Fire Protection Association, 28 percent of heating fires are caused by failing to clean equipment, especially chimneys. Over time, creosote (a sticky, flammable substance that’s released when wood’s burned) can build up in the chimney. If the creosote isn’t removed, a chimney fire can result. This is not only dangerous in itself, but it can also cause damage to the chimney, increasing the risk that flames will reach the frame of the house.

Debris such as fallen leaves and animal nests should also be removed, since they can restrict airflow and cause carbon monoxide to back up into the house. 

If you have a wood-burning fireplace or stove, you should have the chimney professionally inspected at least once a year (before you use it). Ask for a Level 1 inspection, which involves a visual examination of readily accessible parts of the chimney. The inspector will ensure the chimney is sturdy and perform any necessary cleaning.

Have a gas fireplace instead of a wood-burning one? You should still get a regular inspection, as corrosive deposits can build up and prevent your fireplace from venting efficiently. Debris can block this type of chimney as well.

  1. Burn only dry, seasoned wood

Properly seasoned firewood contains around 20 percent water. Freshly cut wood can contain up to 45 percent water, so it takes a lot of heat to get it to catch fire (which means less heat inside your house). Burning wet wood also creates large amounts of smoke and causes creosote to build up more rapidly.

To be properly seasoned, firewood must be cut to length and allowed to dry for at least 6 months (up to a year in damp climates) before being burned. If you’ve gathered a stockpile of wood, be sure to protect it from rain and snow. If you’re buying wood to burn, look for dark edges with visible cracks. Well-seasoned firewood’s fairly lightweight and makes a clear, sharp sound when clapped together.

Resist the temptation to toss wrapping paper, cardboard boxes, or foam containers into the fireplace. Paper and cardboard can cause flames to burn too high, while foam releases toxic smoke and particles into the air.

  1. Make sure your damper’s properly adjusted

The fireplace damper is a plate or valve that controls airflow in your chimney. When the fireplace isn’t in use, keep the damper closed completely to prevent heat from escaping. When lighting the fire, open the damper wide to help create a good blaze and get smoke flowing up the chimney. Once the fire’s burning well, partially close the damper to keep in warmth while still allowing smoke to escape.

  1. Install and regularly check carbon monoxide detectors

Burning wood creates carbon monoxide (a poisonous gas) — but this poses little danger if your chimney’s properly maintained and free from obstructions and if your damper’s letting smoke out. Nonetheless, it’s wise to install smoke and carbon monoxide detectors close to your fireplace as well as in your bedrooms.

In the event that you do have a fire damage, it is best to know what the proper steps are to take in the situation to avoid further damage to your home. Take a look at the SERVPRO Fire Damage Restoration Process:

Our Fire Damage Restoration Services

Since each smoke and fire damage situation is a little different, each one requires a unique solution tailored for the specific conditions. When various materials burn, the soot and residue they create differs greatly and requires a specific cleaning procedure. The steps listed below illustrate our process for the “typical” fire damage restoration. Learn more about our fire damage restoration process.

  1. Emergency Contact
  2. Inspection and Fire Damage Assessment
  3. Immediate Board-Up and Roof Tarp Service (if needed)
  4. Water Removal and Drying (if water damage is present)
  5. Removal of Smoke and Soot from All Surfaces
  6. Cleaning and Repair
  7. Restoration

For more information on what steps you should take to begin the Fire Damage Restoration process and what SERVPRO of

Tarrytown/Elmsford can do for you, take a look at our website here

Have Questions about Fire, Smoke, or Soot Damage? Call us today at (914)358-9000!

Sources:

www.SERVPROoftarrytownelmsford.com

http://blog.esurance.com/4-must-read-tips-for-fireplace-safety/#.Vri1T_krKM8 

Tips: What to do right after a Fire or Smoke Damage?

7/17/2020 (Permalink)

Fire on black background with SERVPRO logo Call SERVPRO of Tarrytown/Elmsford

Experiencing a fire or smoke damage in your house is very stressful for the homeowner. Hopefully, you will never be put in the position of dealing with such a situation, however if you find yourself in this unfortunate position, follow some tips below to prevent further damage while awaiting the arrival of our highly trained technicians:

  • Limit movement in the home to prevent further damage. 
  • Place dry, colorfast towels or old linens on carpeted traffic areas to prevent more soiling.  
  • If electricity is off, empty freezer and refrigerator and prop doors open.  
  • Wipe soot from chrome on kitchen and bathroom faucets and appliances then protect with a light coating of lubricant.
  • Do not attempt to wash any walls or painted surfaces without first contacting a SERVPRO of Tarrytown/Elmsford.
  • Do not attempt to shampoo carpet or upholstered furniture without first consulting a SERVPRO of Tarrytown/Elmsford.
  • Do not attempt to clean any electrical appliances that may have been close to fire or water without consulting a repair service.

Fire Dangers and Safety Tips

5/26/2020 (Permalink)

House with the left side on fire House with the left side on fire

Fire Dangers and Safety Tips

Want some great advice on how to keep your home safe from fire? Just follow these tips and suggestions from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control Division of Unintentional Injury Prevention:

  • The most common causes of residential fires are cooking and heating equipment. When cooking, never leave food on a stove or in an oven unattended, and avoid wearing clothes with long, loose-fitting sleeves.
  • Smoking is the leading cause of fire deaths and the second most common cause of residential fires. If you are a smoker, do not smoke in bed, never leave burning cigarettes unattended, do not empty smoldering ashes in a trash can, and keep ashtrays away from upholstered furniture and curtains.
  • Keep matches and lighters away from children's reach. Safely store flammable substances used around the home, and never leave burning candles unattended.
  • Install smoke alarms outside each separate sleeping area and on every floor of your home, including the basement.Working smoke alarms can reduce the risk of death in a residential fire by 40 to 50 percent. The CDC suggests smoke alarms with lithium-powered batteries and hush buttons. A lithium-powered battery can last up to 10 years, and a hush button allows you to quickly stop nuisance alarms that are caused by steam, oven smoke, etc.
  • If 10-year, long-life smoke alarms are not available, install smoke alarms that use regular batteries and replace the batteries every year. (A useful tip to help you remember: In the fall, when you change your clocks to standard time, change your batteries!)
  • Test smoke alarms every month to make sure they work properly.
  • Make a family fire escape plan and practice it every six months. In the plan, discuss at least two different ways to get out of every room and designate a safe place in front of the house or apartment building for family members to meet after escaping a fire.

BBQ and Grilling Safety Tips

5/22/2020 (Permalink)

Fire and words" on average 8,900 home fires are started by grills each year" Fire and words" on average 8,900 home fires are started by grills each year"

Family cookout is always a pleasant way to kick-off the summer, but to keep your family and friends safe follow these general guidelines.

General grilling tips

  • Propane and charcoal BBQ grills should only be used outdoors.
  • The grill should be placed well away from the home, deck railings and out from under eaves and overhanging branches.
  • Keep children and pets away from the grill area.
  • Keep your grill clean by removing grease or fat buildup from the grills and in trays below the grill.
  • Never leave your grill unattended.

Propane grills

Before you use your grill:

  • Check the major connection points between the gas (propane) tank hose and the regulator and cylinder, and where the hose connects to the burners. Tighten if loose.
  • Check the gas (propane) tank hose for the potential (gas) leaks. To do that:
    • Apply a light soap and water solution to the hose using a brush or spray bottle.
    • Turn the propane tank on. If there is a gas leak, the propane will release bubbles around the hose (big enough to see).
    • If there are no bubbles, your grill is safe to use.
  • If there are bubbles, turn off the tank and check connections, then have your grill serviced by a professional before using it again.
  • If the leak doesn’t stop, call the fire department immediately.

When the grill is on:

  • As you are cooking, if you smell gas, turn off the gas tank and burners.
  • If the leak stops immediately, get the grill serviced by a professional before using it again.
  • If the smell continues, move away from the grill and call the fire department immediately. Do not move the grill.

Charcoal grills

  • There are several ways to get the charcoal ready to use. Charcoal chimney starters allow you to start the charcoal using newspaper as a fuel.
  • If you use a starter fluid, use only charcoal starter fluid. Never add charcoal fluid or any other flammable liquids to the fire.
  • Keep charcoal fluid out of the reach of children and away from heat sources.
  • There are also electric charcoal starters, which do not use fire. Be sure to use an extension cord for outdoor use.
  • When you are finished grilling, let the coals completely cool before disposing in a metal container.

Source: https://www.nfpa.org/Public-Education/By-topic/Top-causes-of-fire/Cooking/Grilling/Grilling-safety-tips

Safety Tips for Burning Candles

2/10/2020 (Permalink)

Red Candle burning Red Candle burning

Safety Tips for Burning Candles

As we begin to welcome the Holiday Season, it is important that our families and homes stay safe. Published by the National Candle Association, the following are important tips to keep in mind when using candles.

  • Never leave a burning candle unattended.
  • Never burn a candle on or near anything that might catch fire.
  • Keep candles out of the reach of children and pets.

HOW TO BURN A CANDLE SAFELY

BEFORE LIGHTING

  • Before burning, always trim the wick to ¼ inch. You can use a wick trimmer, nail clippers, or scissors. Long or crooked wicks can cause uneven burning, dripping or flaring.
  • Always use a candle holder specifically designed for candle use. It should be heat resistant, sturdy, and large enough to contain any drips or melted wax.
  • Burn candles in a well-ventilated room.
  • Keep the wax pool clear of wick trimmings, matches and debris at all times.

WHILE BURNING

  • Never touch or move a burning candle. Never move a votive or container candle when the wax is liquefied.
  • Extinguish a candle if the flame becomes too high or flickers repeatedly. Let the candle cool, trim the wick, and check for unwanted drafts before re-lighting.
  • Always keep the candle within your sight. If you are going to leave the room, be sure to first blow out all candles.
  • Be very careful if using candles during a power outage. Flashlights and other battery-powered lights are safer sources of light during a power failure. Never use a candle during a power outage to look for things in a closet, or when fueling equipment – such as a lantern or kerosene heater.
  • Never burn a candle on or near anything that can catch fire. Keep burning candles away from furniture, drapes, bedding, carpets, books, paper, flammable decorations, etc.
  • Keep candles out of the reach of children and pets. Do not place lighted candles where they can be knocked over by children, pets or anyone else.

WHEN EXTINGUISHING

  • Make sure the candle is completely out and the wick ember is no longer glowing before leaving the room.

 *SOURCE: HOME CANDLE FIRES, FIRE ANALYSIS AND RESEARCH DIVISION, NATIONAL FIRE PROTECTION ASSOCIATION, DECEMBER 2015. BASED ON 2009-2013 ANNUAL AVERAGES"

Thanksgiving Safety

11/20/2019 (Permalink)

Pie split into percentage of home fires Pie split into percentage of home fires

With the popularity of turkey frying increasing every year, people are at risk for fryer-related fires and injuries. U.S. fire departments are responding to more than 1,000 deep fire related incidents each year. According to the National Fire Protection Association deep fryer fires result in more than $15 million in property damage each year. Here are some rules to follow when deep frying a turkey.

Don’t Deep Fry a Frozen Turkey Frozen turkeys are full of moisture. Make sure your turkey is completely thawed out because water and hot oil don’t mix well.

Don’t Let Oil Get Too Hot If you see your oil smoking, it is too hot. When oil gets around 400-425-degrees it can catch on fire by itself. So, when deep frying a turkey most oils should stay around 350-degrees.

Don’t Use Too Much Oil When deep-frying a turkey a common mistake people make is putting too much cooking oil in their pot. Overfilling your pot can result in the oil spilling over into the flame on the burner. If you need to figure out how much oil you need try putting your turkey in an empty pot, fill the pot with enough water to cover the turkey. Once you remove the turkey mark the water line.

Don’t Deep Fry Indoors You should never deep-fry a turkey in your house, garage or on a deck. You should always deep fry a turkey in a yard away from anything that’s flammable.

Hopefully, this Thanksgiving will go smoothly. However, if a fire does occur and your home suffers fire damage, it can be especially devastating. In addition to the fire and smoke damage, your property may have substantial water damage from firefighting efforts. SERVPRO of Tarrytown/Elmsford has the specialized fire and water damage equipment and expertise to help you through this tough time.